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Hrafnhildur Arnardottir / Shoplifter part of group show at Turner Contemporary


13 Jan - 2017

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Sat 28 Jan – Sun 7 May 2017
Turner Contemporary, Margate
Hrafnhildur Arnardottir / Shoplifter will be part of Entangled: Threads & Making is a major exhibition of sculpture, installation, tapestry, textiles and jewellery from the early 20th century to the present day. It features over 40 international female artists who expand the possibilities of knitting and embroidery, weaving, sewing and wood carving, often incorporating unexpected materials such as plants, clothing, hair and bird quills.
Entangled: Threads & Making is curated by writer and critic Karen Wright, with Turner Contemporary. Wright became fascinated by the making processes she saw first-hand on the many studio visits she did with artists for her ‘In the Studio’ column for the Independent. The idea for Entangled: Threads & Making evolved out of these visits, in particular one with renowned American artist Kiki Smith who was working on her epic tapestry Sky (2012), included in the exhibition.
The exhibition brings together artists from different generations and cultures who challenge established categories of craft, design and fine art, and who share a fascination with the handmade and the processes of making itself.
A new publication accompanies the exhibition, with essays and interviews by Ann Coxon, Stina Hogkvist, Siri Husvedt, Kathryn Lloyd, Rosa Martinez, Marit Paasche, Frances Morris and Karen Wright. Available from the Turner Contemporary shop.
Karen Wright, Curator says:
“When we first set out to create Entangled: Threads & Making, over 3 years ago, I was initially overwhelmed by how many artists wanted to take part in the show. It gave the idea currency, at a time when little had been done in investigating this area both in terms of gender, but also in terms of materials. For me, the show is an opportunity to re-evaluate the political status of women in the market place as well as the way that they use materials and express their concerns.”

HRAFNHILDUR ARNARDOTTIR / SHOPLIFTER, Nervescape IV(2015) at the Nordic Biennial. Photo: courtesy Momentum


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Nick Waplington – solo show of new paintings opens Wednesday 1st February


13 Jan - 2017

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THE SEARCH FOR A SUPERIOR MORAL JUSTIFICATION FOR SELFISHNESS
Private View – Wednesday 1st February, 7 – 9pm
Exhibition continues – 2nd February – 4th March 2017

TJ Boulting is delighted to present the gallery’s first solo show with Nick Waplington. For the past three decades he has forged his career primarily as a photographer, and was the first living British artist to have a solo photography show at the Tate in 2014. Yet in recent years he has steadily dedicated a large part of his practice to painting and drawing.
He first began painting in 1995, and it developed in 2007 whilst he was completing a long-term photography project in Israel. After taking photographs outside all day, he found he had time and a favourable environment for painting. In contrast to his photographs, which were outward looking, the paintings were abstract and coming more from his internal state of mind as a reaction to the contemporary world around him. His influences have always stemmed from many things: his surroundings, online porn, the Internet, music, political chaos and the contradictions of everyday life. They are all very much of the present, the here and now. As he says: “I am seeking and searching constantly. People ask me what I find interesting, and the answer is everything.”
Then followed long periods living and working in Los Angeles and New York; in particular spending hours painting in his outside studio in LA, making the most of the long, light, sun-filled days, and on the roof of his studio back in London in the summer. Absorbing the positive nature of the light informed his attitude towards a seemingly negative world. The paintings in this exhibition were all completed between 2016 and the present day, primarily in LA and some in London, and are all acrylic on canvas, 4 x 6 feet in dimension. There is also a wall of works on paper taken directly from his A3 sketchpad and pinned to the wall. For now and for this particular body of work it is very much about the psycho-geography of LA, the streets, the chaos, the light and the social contrasts and conflicts. The titles manifest themselves from his own late night sketches and mental meanderings, infused with literary snippets from authors such as Beckett, Goethe and Milan Kundera.
An intensely prolific artist, he continues to take photographs, produce books, make sketchbooks full of words and drawings, whilst his painting takes a slow trajectory. Although not immediately or literally related, all of his works somehow inform each other, and his paintings in particular, where each one will lead him to the next one in a constantly evolving cycle. He is curious about mixing the high with the low and what that says about society. He juxtaposed his photographs of the fashion world with those of rubbish dumps in his Alexander McQueen Tate show ‘Working Progress’; his way of commenting on the chaos and physical materials of both. In his project ‘The Patriarch’s Wardrobe’, soon to be displayed at the Whitechapel Gallery as part of David Campany’s exhibition ‘A Handful of Dust’, he juxtaposed his photographs of rubbish dumps in the occupied West Bank, scavenged by Palestinian children, with his paintings of the region, inspired by its colour palette. He succinctly describes the difference between the two mediums and what unites them: “My paintings deal with this inner world, whereas my photographic work deals with the world around me,” says Waplington, “I guess the basic difference is with photography the canvas is full and with painting it’s empty. Both give me problems.”
Underlying all of this activity is his constant curiosity with the world around him and the feeling that to observe his work, in whatever medium, is to observe an artist always one step ahead of the game, leaving us to ask what is he doing now, and where is this leading? Only time will tell.

BIO
Nick Waplington studied at Nottingham University for his BA in Fine Art in 1988 before completing his MA with Distinction at the Royal College of Art in 1990. He received an ICP Infinity award in 1993, and was in the Harold Szeemann curated group exhibition in the Arsenale of Venice Biennale in 2001. He has exhibited widely including a solo show at the Whitechapel Gallery, London (Double Dactyl, 2007), and The Philadelphia Museum of Art (Living Room, 1992). His work is held in a number of prominent museum collections including the Guggenheim Museum, New York, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, and MoMA, New York. He has had two recent solo shows of his paintings in LA. He is the author of over twenty publications including Living Room, 1991, Other Edens, 1993, Terry Painter L’artiste, 2003, Settlement, 2014 and three with Trolley Books Learn How To Die The Easy Way, 2002, You Love Life, 2005 and Double Dactyl, 2007. His work has been most recently exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum, Tate Modern, Tate Britain and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art; his next group show A Handful of Dust curated by David Campany will be at the Whitechapel Gallery from 7 June – 3 September 2017. He lives and works in Los Angeles and New York and is temporarily based in London. Click here to see other amazing painters and decorators in london.


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Stephanie Quayle’s JENGA at The Fitzrovia Chapel


13 Jan - 2017

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Fitzroy Place, 2 Pearson Square, London. W1T 3BF

Private View Monday 23rd January, 6-8pm
PUBLIC OPENING TIMES
Saturday 21st January 11am–6pm
Wednesday 25th January 11am–6pm
Saturday 28th January 11am–6pm
BY APPOINTMENT
22nd – 29th January
Please contact info@tjboulting.com or +44(0)20 7729 6591
TJ Boulting is delighted to present artist Stephanie Quayle’s large-scale installation Jenga at The Fitzrovia Chapel. Over forty fired clay monkeys of various shapes and sizes are perched atop the giant ‘jenga’ wooden structure within the stunning Grade II* listed building, surrounded by its ornate gold mosaic ceiling and marble walls.
Jenga was first commissioned for the 56th Venice Biennale in 2015 as part of the group exhibition Vita Vitale, curated by Artwise for the Azerbaijan Pavilion. The theme of the pavilion asked artists to explore the human impact on the natural world and the future preservation and sustainability of the planet’s environment and ecosystem. Stephanie Quayle has long been fascinated with the animal form, and creates expressive life-size sculptures fired in clay that capture the movement and character of the creature, from imposing elephants to mischievous monkeys.
For this commission she responded with her most ambitious work to date. The monkeys were specifically chosen for being endangered species – Golden Lion Tamarins, Cotton Top Tamarins, Snub Nose monkeys (with the blue faces), little Emperor Tamarins (with the white whiskers) and the larger Vervets and Macaques. Jenga is the wellknown game whereby wood blocks are placed in a tower-like formation one on top of each other. Each block is then tentatively removed one by one until the structure collapses. The ‘jenga’ reference here is a metaphor for the instability of the monkeys’ plight, that they sit all over it unknowing of their fate, the fragile nature of their existence out of their control and in the hands of humans – will we continue to destroy the planet, one by one pulling the wooden pieces out of the structure until it all tumbles down?
The wood itself is old and decaying, reclaimed joists from timber barns and old wooden railway sleepers, with the lingering smell of creosote a reminder of man’s toxic influence. It also alludes to the wood lost in deforestation, the senseless bringing down of habitats and irreparable damage of ecosystems. Her monkeys in turn are poised, looking, watching, waiting – to see what the next move in this giant game will bring them.
The Fitzrovia Chapel is recently restored and reopened, and was the chapel for the original Middlesex Hospital which was demolished in 2005. The chapel was designed in 1891 by celebrated Victorian architect John Loughborough Pearson and was completed posthumously in 1929 by his son Frank. It was heavily inspired by the Italian gothic style and in particular San Marco in Venice, and even employed Italian materials and craftsmen to complete the work. Now the chapel is open once again, at the heart of the Fitzrovia community.



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Juliana Cerqueira Leite talks about her artist book at Spoonbill and Sugartown, NYC


3 Dec - 2016

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Monday, December 5, 2016.
6:30-8:00pm
Spoonbill & Sugartown Bookseller
99 Montrose Ave.
Brooklyn, 11206
On Monday, December 5 at 6:30pm Juliana Cerqueira Leite will give an artist book talk and slide show at the new branch of Spoonbill & Sugartown Booksellers.
She will be speaking about representations of female anatomy and her first artist book ‘A Potential Space’. The talk will be followed by a Q&A, there will be copies of the book present for viewing and on sale.
Watch a video trailer for the book here.

A Potential Space is a small edition artist book and a work of ‘anatomical fiction’ that aims to challenge and re-imagine how the vagina is represented.
The vagina is a protean organ located inside the body, similar in its actions to a potential space: the anatomical term used to describe instances where tissues inside the body are normally pressed against each other, but not attached, giving them the ability to separate and generate space. This laser-cut book contains 83 individual outlines that describe a 3D scan of a cast vagina, reproducing this organ to scale as a negative space within the book’s pages.
A Potential Space proposes a rereading of the metaphors that frame the vagina and its relationship to space—and a redrawing of the borders of its representation—to unobscure a bodily allegiance to choice and change. The book is accompanied by a text written by the artist, presented as a folded insert.
Published 2016 / 75 editions plus 8 artist proofs / Coptic bound hardcover by Small Editions NY / Letterpress by Middle Press / Offset print by Rolling Press / Made in Brooklyn NY / $750
For more information please visit: www.apotentialspace.com


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Rachel Howard book launch and Will Self reading at the Fitzrovia Chapel


24 Nov - 2016

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The launch for artist Rachel Howard’s book ‘Paintings of Violence (Why I am not a mere Christian) was held at the beautifully restored and recently reopened Fitzrovia Chapel, with Will Self reading his essay from the book.








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Miss Vogue meets Miss Juno Calypso


11 Jul - 2016

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Miss Vogue interviewed Juno Calypso whose work was recently exhibited in TJ Boulting’s group show ‘Now You See Me’ as well as in our booth at Photo London.
click image for full interview


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Anima: An evening talk featuring portrait photographers in the Anima Exhibition


25 Jun - 2016

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Director Hannah Watson hairing a talk about portraiture in their work with Tereza Cervenova, Aleksandra Kingo, Tom Oldham and Peter Zelewski at the Printspace on Tuesday as part of their new exhibition
click image for more details


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director Hannah Watson – interview for Something Curated


21 Jun - 2016

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Something Curate interviewed our director Hannah Watson..
“Housed in the elegant Arts and Crafts block at the corner of Riding House Street and Candover Street, TJ Boulting represents emerging British and international talent, often showcasing artists that have not exhibited in London before.”
click image to read full interview


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Alixandra Fazzina – ‘A Million Shillings – Escape from Somalia’ book signing


9 Jun - 2016

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Alixandra Fazzina will be in LA at the Annenberg Space for Photography Friday 10th June giving a lecture on visualising migration and signing copies of her book ‘A Million Shillings – Escape from Somalia’.


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Haley Morris-Cafiero featured on Mic.com


7 Jun - 2016

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Haley Morris-Cafiero recent feature on Mic.com bout ‘what happens when someone overweight dares to occupy public space’, – a great project that’s what! See her work in current group show at TJ Boulting ‘Now You See Me’, on until 2nd July


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